Press 

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Between Riverside and Crazy

This is a marvelous production, due in large part to director Robert Barry Fleming recognizing that the play contains social commentary and truth telling on par with the works of Lanford Wilson, employs powerful and poignant language reminiscent of Tennessee Williams and, like Arthur Miller, finds immense heroism residing in broken people.

Fleming respects the work by allowing it to speak for itself without distraction. And he has cast exceptional out-of-town talent who bring both the comedy and the drama to the forefront with remarkable dexterity, realism...

-Bob Abelman, Cleveland Jewish News

In his directorial debut at the Play House, associate artistic director Robert Barry Fleming keeps the nasty wit of playwright Stephen Aldy Guirgis at the center, delivering a corrosive tragicomedy laced with Guirgis' famous profanity (never have so many mothers been verbally defiled) and motor-mouth word play.

- Andrea Simakis, The Plain Dealer

The CPH production, as directed by Robert Barry Fleming, the theater’s associate artistic director, in his local directing debut, is well-paced, nicely nuanced, and plays the humor against the angst. The cast is excellent and nicely textures their performances, walking the thin line between comedy and drama.

- Roy Berko, Cleveland Cool


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Caroline or Change

Director-choreographer Robert Barry Fleming finds sobering humanity and redeeming humor in author-lyricist Tony Kushner and composer Jeanine Tesori’s moving ensemble piece.

-Michael Grossberg, The Columbus Dispatch

...it’s a testament to Fleming that this production moves as fluidly and naturally as it does, his liquid choreography understands how people move. It slips into dance without ever stooping to a moment of transition, there’s no “We’re dancing now,” suddenly the movements just catch fire. He understands the delicate balance between fantasy and reality this play needs and the micro- and macro-rhythms.

-Richard Sanford, Columbus Underground


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Destiny of Desire

Full-blown production numbers break out here and there which features eclectic choreography by Robert Barry Fleming...And, my gosh, even each scene change/transition is an amusing event in itself. The cast doesn't just place a doorway or a curtain or a set piece down at their marks with determined precision, they frikkin ballet dance (!) these things to their places on the stage (the hoisting of the enormous chandelier as the set transforms to the Castillo mansion is a particularly funny, exaggerated sequence).

-Michael L. Quintos, Broadway World

They ...move with lascivious grace through the show’s numerous song-and-dance numbers (per... Robert Barry Fleming).

- Kevin Green, NewCity Chicago

Most of the actors do play more than one role, and there are lots of set changes that are done by the cast, but done as a sort of dance (choreographer Robert Barry Fleming has done a superb job) that is indeed very “camp”!

Alan Bresloff, Around the Town Chicago

The show is crazy comical, colorful and continually provocative. Jose Luis Valenzuela, assisted by choreographer Robert Barry Fleming and musical director Rosino Serrano, guides this fast-moving production and brings out the best in his gifted acting ensemble.

-Colin Douglas, Chicago Theater Review

The flair of Valenzuela's production is accentuated by Robert Barry Fleming's choreography, which has the actors float across the stage with their arms aloft after finishing a scene.

- Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times


Cat on a Hot Tin Roof

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If you missed the Juneau run of Perseverance Theatre’s “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof” and you’re planning on being in Anchorage in April, I highly recommend you catch the production at the Alaska Center for the Performing Arts. This is a standout show, anchored by riveting performances...directed by Robert Barry Fleming...As Brick says in the second act, “Communication is -- awful hard between people.” For me this is part of what makes this story timeless and accessible. I was grateful to see it brought to life so beautifully. 

-Amy Fletcher, Juneau Empire

Milvotchkee, Visconsin

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Director Robert Barry Fleming has experienced Alzheimer’s firsthand in caring for his ill mother, and his sensitive, nuanced direction is brutally realistic.

-Pam Kragen, San Diego Union-Tribune

Stick Fly

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I suppose you could call “Stick Fly” an upper-class sitcom, but what sets it apart from most of that genre is playwright Diamond’s facility for clever, intelligent and engaging dialogue of the Aaron Sorkin variety, aided here by terrific production values including Fleming’s excellent direction.

-Jean Lowerison, San Diego Gay and Lesbian News

She Loves Me

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In a word, the production, directed by Robert Barry Fleming, is wonderful, and delivers a version of the much-revived show that is about as good as it can be.

-Pat Craig, Contra Costa Times

The Little Dog Laughed

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One unexpected delight of the Diversionary production is the speed and expertise with which director Robert Barry Fleming moves his cast from one mode to the other, never skipping a beat or missing a laugh in Beane's crackling, one-liner-strewn writing. Fleming...makes a strong directorial debut at Diversionary.

-Ann Marie Welsh, North County Times

There is much serious (and cynical) commentary about Hollywood and the closet in The Little Dog Laughed, and quite a sweet love story as well, but with Beane writing the lines, you’re never more than ten seconds from the next laugh, especially with a cast as splendid as the one assembled here under the crackerjack direction of Robert Barry Fleming, who never lets them miss a comic beat.

-Steven Stanley, StageScene LA

Ella: The Musical

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"Ella"...hits all the right notes [and] is a near-guaranteed pleasure. Cason and most of the company in director Robert Barry Fleming's production rise well above that level.

-Robert Hurwitt, San Francisco Chronicle